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Thumbnail for Dark Passage (1947) Dark Passage (1947)

Basic Info Rusty's rating: 78
Notable as: Film noirGenre: Film noir, Thriller, Crime Fiction, Romance Film, DramaNarrative location: San FranciscoRuntime: 102 - 106 minutesLanguage: EnglishCountry: United StatesFilming location: San FranciscoDirector: Delmer DavesScreenwriter: Delmer Daves, David GoodisMusic: Franz WaxmanCinematography: Sidney HickoxStars: Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Bruce Bennett, Agnes Moorehead, Tom D'Andrea, Clifton Young, Douglas Kennedy, Rory Mallinson, Houseley StevensonProducer: Jerry WaldStudio: Warner Bros.Award details: (details at IMDb)
Description

Dark Passage is a Warner Bros. film noir directed by Delmer Daves and starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. The film is based on the novel of the same name by David Goodis. It was the third of four films real-life couple Bacall and Bogart made together. The film is notable for employing cinematography that avoided showing the face of Bogart's character, Vincent Parry, prior to the point in the story at which Vincent undergoes plastic surgery to change his appearance. The majority of the pre-surgery scenes are shot from Vincent's point of view. In those scenes shot from other perspectives, the camera is always positioned so that its field of view does not include his face. The story follows Vincent's attempts to hide from the law and clear his name of murder.


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