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Thumbnail for In a Lonely Place (1950) In a Lonely Place (1950)

Basic Info Rusty's rating: 80
Notable as: Film noirGenre: Film noir, Crime Fiction, Mystery, Thriller, Romance Film, DramaRuntime: 94 minutesLanguage: EnglishCountry: United StatesDirector: Nicholas RayScreenwriter: Edmund H. North, Dorothy B. HughesMusic: George AntheilCinematography: Burnett GuffeyStars: Gloria Grahame, Humphrey Bogart, Frank Lovejoy, Art Smith, Carl Benton Reid, Morris Ankrum, Steven Geray, William Ching, Martha Stewart, Robert Warwick, Jeff DonnellProducer: Robert LordStudio: Columbia PicturesAwards won: National Film RegistryAward details: (details at IMDb)
Description

In a Lonely Place is a 1950 film noir directed by Nicholas Ray, and starring Humphrey Bogart and Gloria Grahame, produced for Bogart's Santana Productions. The script was adapted by Edmund North from the 1947 novel In a Lonely Place by Dorothy B. Hughes. Bogart stars in the film as Dixon Steele, a cynical screenwriter suspected of murder. Grahame co-stars as Laurel Gray, a neighbor who falls under his spell. Beyond its surface plot of confused identity and tormented lust, the film is a mordant comment on Hollywood mores and the pitfalls of celebrity and near-celebrity, like two other American films released that same year, Billy Wilder's Sunset Boulevard and Joseph Mankiewicz's All About Eve. Although lesser known than his other work, Bogart's performance in this film is considered by many critics to be among his finest and the film's reputation itself has grown over time along with Ray's. The film is now considered a classic film noir, as evidenced by its inclusion on the Time magazine "All-Time 100 List" as well as Slant Magazine's 100 Essential Films.


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