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Thumbnail for Gimme Shelter (1970) Gimme Shelter (1970)

Basic Info Rusty's rating: 77
Category: Documentary, Music/MusicalSub-Category: documentary filmRuntime: 91 minutesColor: colorLanguage: EnglishCountry: United StatesDirector: Charlotte Zwerin, Albert Maysles, David MayslesCinematography: Albert and David MayslesStars: Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts, Keith Richards, Mick Taylor, Bill WymanProducer: Porter BibbAward details: (details at IMDb)
Description

This documentary of the Rolling Stones' 1969 US tour has become a legendary, harrowing symbol of the tragic demise of the "Peace and Love" era. After a successful tour across the US, the Rolling Stones gave a free December concert at Altamont Speedway in California with the Grateful Dead, Ike and Tina Turner, Jefferson Airplane, and the Flying Burrito Brothers. The band unwisely selected the Hells Angels to provide security, and the bikers resorted to violence to keep the stoned, restless, and often naked crowd in line. The result: dozens of injuries and the on-screen stabbing of a young black man (during "Sympathy for the Devil") by one of the concert's staff security. In a manipulative but effective move, the Maysles brothers filmed Mick Jagger in the editing room witnessing the on-camera murder for the first time. The film also works as a rock-and-roll document, capturing the band at their most relaxed, intoxicating, and electrifying.


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